HRT Hightsville NC

Find Hightsville Hormone Replacement Near You Today

If you’re looking for relief from menopause symptoms, knowing the pros and cons of Hightsville hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can help you decide whether it’s right for you.

Hormone Replacement

What Is HightsvilleHormone Replacement Therapy?

HRT (also known as hormone therapy, menopausal hormone therapy, and estrogen replacement therapy) uses female hormones — estrogen and progesterone — to treat common symptoms of menopause and aging. Doctors can prescribe it during or after menopause.

After your period stops, your hormone levels fall, causing uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and sometimes conditions like osteoporosis. Hightsville HRT replaces hormones your body no longer makes. It’s the most effective treatment for menopause symptoms.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy - What Is The Process?

Hormone Replacement Therapy Drugs

Other improvements in the field of testosterone replacement therapy include different ways of administering testosterone. In the past, testosterone was taken in the form of pills. However, oral intake impacts the effectiveness of the therapy. Also, the medication has to be digested in the liver first before it is absorbed by the body. This dilutes the effect of the medicine and also puts the liver under tremendous stress. These days, testosterone is given through skin patches or injections so that absorption takes place transdermally.

Men undergoing testosterone replacement therapy are generally quite satisfied with the results they experience in terms of increased youthfulness, better muscle mass, lower body fat and of course, remarkable sex drive!

However, patients must be warned that they do not approach the therapy with unusually high expectations. The immediate effects of the therapy are quite intangible. Changes will be observed but these will be small changes only. Do not expect anything dramatic.

The debate as to whether bio-identical hormone therapy trumps other forms of hormone therapies that seek to reverse the effects of menopause is still a raging one. The key here is to find out if the risks outweigh the benefits, or vise versa. The hormones in bio-identical therapy are chemically identical to your body's hormones. Although estrogen and progesterone from this therapy are not known to increase the risk of breast cancer, other constituent components, the likes of synthetic progestins; medroxyprogesterone acetate heighten that risk.

Although hormone therapy is a delicate balance, bio-identical therapy does have its benefits. It is known to result in lesser bleeding, but, like any hormone therapy; they don't have this same effect on everyone. A history in cancer, blood clots and other conditions are usually red flags for people considering bio-identical therapy. Some women tend not to respond to the therapy, as they should, laying testament to the fact that hormone therapy is far from an exact science.

Lifestyle is another key aspect of hormonal therapy that is perennially downplayed. In the same way that pathological smoking and alcohol consumption may speed up your transition to menopause, these habits could as well cause an adverse reaction to any type of hormonal therapy. Note that there are many variables here, ergo; one should consult a physician or pharmacist specialist before taking any steps. The efficacy of bio-identical therapy could be highly dependent on slight lifestyle changes that may make all the difference. Finally, bio-identical components are run through a rigorous quality assurance process, plant synthesized, and are fitted to suit individual hormonal needs.

The existing methods of delivery currently include injection, pills, patches, or gel.

Of the injection method, normally it is done either weekly or fortnightly - but the concern is that there will be peaks and troughs of testosterone levels between the last and next injection. These rises and falls of testosterone level can mean high energy and motivation immediately following the injection, gradually waning to lethargy and perhaps even depression leading up to the next injection.

The pills method also has its problems, because the digestive process. Taking pills causes a mass flood of testosterone to be sent to the liver, which is not about it and metabolizes it into estrogen which defeats the whole purpose. The bottom-line is that you are swallowing a lot more testosterone than ever enters your bloodstream.

Patches do provide a regular supply of testosterone directly into your bloodstream via the skin, the only real down-side with them is skin irritation caused by the patches. Rotating to new sites every day can reduce this.

If you truly must have replacement therapy, then without doubt gel is the best of all options. If provides a steady release every day of the hormone into your blood through the skin, and it has no skin irritation side effects.

Better still would be to consider boosting your own production of testosterone using dietary supplements.

Hormone Replacement Therapy - What Are the Benefits?

What Is Hormone Therapy

As opposed to many hormone therapies, bioidentical hormone therapy actually uses natural hormones that are found in the human body. Other therapies may use similar, synthetic hormones to perform treatment. Hormone therapies have helped many men and women replenish hormone levels that may be diminished thanks to certain medical conditions such as menopause or andropause.

Bioidentical hormone therapy has been beneficial to women going through menopause or early menopause. This therapy has helped treat the symptoms of menopause including hot flashes, night sweats, memory loss, mood swings, weight gain and decreased libido. This treatment helps to replace the natural hormones that may be at decreased levels during this time.

Men may also be candidates for this therapy as well. Andropause has been described as the male menopause and is described as the gradual reduction of androgens in the body. Symptoms of this condition may include weight gain, decreased libido, fatigue, stress and energy loss. Through this treatment, many men have successfully replaced their natural hormones and have found relief from these symptoms.

Often a clinic that specializes in "Hormone Replacement Therapy" is immediately regarded as an "estrogen" or "testosterone" clinic implying the patients are there for "sexual dysfunction". That simply is not the case if one is going to a "hormonal wellness clinic" or "science based HRT clinic". The reason for the reference by many to the sexual side is much of the discussion centers on what is known as male or female hormones related to sexual functions and sexual male/female characteristics. There are many more hormones than those two, and even those two may require the use of other hormones, specifically DHEA, to effectively assimilate those two hormones into our system properly.

My personal experience has been I go to my medical doctor, actually his experience/training is as an emergency room doctor, and Dr. Hummel analyzes a vast array of hormones and other chemicals to assess whether my body is meeting the minimum demands for hormones for me to live healthy. He looks at the typical blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, testosterone, thyroid function and many more. A baseline is established so the results of hormonal supplements, if needed, can be monitored and measured. If hormones or other medications, such as statins, is warranted then those are prescribed. Several weeks/months later new blood work is ordered to verify the underlying unhealthy pathologies are reversing and improving.

The Risks of Hormone Replacement Therapy for Women

Menopause Hormone Therapy

The average age for menopause is 51.4 years. This age has changed very little over the years. However, there is a long period of time prior to the menopause, that lasts approximately 10 years, which is referred to as the climacteric or peri-menopause phase.

So how does a person know when she has completed menopause and transitions into post-menopause? Once you have gone without menstruating for a consecutive 12 month period, then you are considered to have completed the menopause.

Until 2002 hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was routinely used to treat menopausal symptoms and protect long term health. So what changed in 2002? Well, there was a large clinical trial called the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) that reported that HRT actually caused more health risks than benefits for the women in the trial. Doctors started to get very nervous about prescribing it to their patients and as a result, up to two-thirds of women discontinued its use, quite often without even discussing it with their physicians.

Even though there is still plenty of confusion surrounding HRT, it is still considered the most effective treatment for dealing with menopausal symptoms.


North Carolina HRT