Hormone Therapy Ogden NC

Find Ogden Hormone Replacement Near You Today

If you’re looking for relief from menopause symptoms, knowing the pros and cons of Ogden hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can help you decide whether it’s right for you.

Hormone Replacement Therapy For Women

What Is OgdenHormone Replacement Therapy?

HRT (also known as hormone therapy, menopausal hormone therapy, and estrogen replacement therapy) uses female hormones — estrogen and progesterone — to treat common symptoms of menopause and aging. Doctors can prescribe it during or after menopause.

After your period stops, your hormone levels fall, causing uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and sometimes conditions like osteoporosis. Ogden HRT replaces hormones your body no longer makes. It’s the most effective treatment for menopause symptoms.

Herbs and Supplements for Menopausal Symptoms - Is there Any Evidence of Benefit?

Menopausal Hormone Therapy

Many doctors and patients have been concerned about reports that estrogen replacement raises the risk of cancer, but is not be the case, if done properly.

When progesterone is given along with estrogen for ten or more days per cycle, it not only eliminates the risk of this cancer but may actually reduce it beyond that which occurs spontaneously. Researchers suggest that the progestin was the good guy in combination of estrogen in hormone replacement therapy, first stimulating mitosis, or breast cell division, followed by the reverse, apoptosis. They speculate that a combined continuous regimen of estrogen and progestin could counteract the cell division needed to produce a cancer.

Women on estrogen therapy have a lower risk of dying from breast cancer than those who do not take hormones.

Estrogen alone has been shown to protect against coronary heart disease, lower cholesterol, and preserve brain function. Estrogen replacement not only sharpens memory and lifts the spirit, but it helps protect against Alzheimer's and shows promise as a treatment for the disease. Estrogen and progesterone work in tandem in the body premenopausally and, increasingly, physicians believe that both hormones should be replaced postmenopausally.

Progesterone alone breaks down fat, increases energy through fat loss, protects against endometrial and breast cancer, improves mood and sexual function, and normalizes the levels of blood sugar, zinc, and copper.

The overall beneficial effects of combined estrogen-progesterone replacement make a good case for multihormonal replacement therapy.

By combining these hormones with DHEA and melatonin, both of which have an anti-cancer effect, and growth hormone that stimulates the natural killer cells that fight cancer, you may be able to enjoy all the health-giving, age-reversing benefits of female sex hormone replacement while lowering the risk of cancer. It is important to see a physician regarding this to make sure it is medically monitored and done properly.

Are you entering the menopause stage of life and are seeking an alternative HRT, hormone replacement therapy? Do you have a loss of bladder control caused by weakened pelvic floor muscles?

Then strengthening those muscles through exercise could be the answer and Kegel Exercise can help as a part of an alternative hormone replacement therapy.

Many women with have a loss of bladder control as they reach menopause. But there is good news! Exercising the muscles located around the vaginal opening and anus several times each day can bring positive results within eight weeks.

This exercise works even for older women.

These exercises are referred to as 'Kegel' exercises, named after Dr. Arnold Kegel, the surgeon who developed this therapy.

Depression is mainly attributed to hormonal imbalance. During depression, serotonin, a chemical that is responsible for a person's mood, tends to drop. Low level of serotonin makes a person feel sad. On the other hand, high level of this chemical makes a person feel happy. The change in serotonin level is determined by estrogen hormones. Thus when estrogen level tends to decline, so does the production of serotonin. This hormonal imbalance is the reason behind depression. Managing depression means handling hormonal imbalance. This further means that Hormone Replacement Therapy can help people get out of their depression.

Doctors use synthetic hormones in Hormone Replacement Therapy. Synthetic hormones are created in laboratories rather than by the body. However, synthetic hormones used in Hormone Replacement Therapy act like natural hormones once inside the body. To treat depression, estrogen is restored by using synthetic estrogen. The synthetic estrogen will act like a natural one. The aim of Hormone Replacement Therapy is to replenish the level of estrogen in the body so that the level of serotonin will also increase. Once this is achieved, depression will not be an issue. As long as the level of estrogen is high, the person will not feel symptoms of depression.

Bioidentical Hormones - What Are They?

Menopause Hormone Therapy

The existing methods of delivery currently include injection, pills, patches, or gel.

Of the injection method, normally it is done either weekly or fortnightly - but the concern is that there will be peaks and troughs of testosterone levels between the last and next injection. These rises and falls of testosterone level can mean high energy and motivation immediately following the injection, gradually waning to lethargy and perhaps even depression leading up to the next injection.

The pills method also has its problems, because the digestive process. Taking pills causes a mass flood of testosterone to be sent to the liver, which is not about it and metabolizes it into estrogen which defeats the whole purpose. The bottom-line is that you are swallowing a lot more testosterone than ever enters your bloodstream.

Patches do provide a regular supply of testosterone directly into your bloodstream via the skin, the only real down-side with them is skin irritation caused by the patches. Rotating to new sites every day can reduce this.

If you truly must have replacement therapy, then without doubt gel is the best of all options. If provides a steady release every day of the hormone into your blood through the skin, and it has no skin irritation side effects.

Better still would be to consider boosting your own production of testosterone using dietary supplements.

Many women who are entering their middle years and going into menopause, or perimenopause as it's called, are confused about the hype surrounding something called HRT. HRT is an acronym for Hormone Replacement Therapy, and it's a therapy intended to treat or ease the annoying side effects of menopause by replacing the lost hormones, i.e. estrogen and progesterone, and occasionally even, testosterone. Confused yet? Good. But keep reading, anyway, it will get better... hopefully.

A lot of the confusion has to do with the usage of words such as "Natural," "Synthetic" and "Bioidentical." We all think we know the meaning of natural and synthetic - natural is good, synthetic is bad and bioidentical just sounds scary.

"Natural" hormones are created within a biological organism, be it human, animal or plant matter. To be considered "natural," a hormone must share the same characteristics as its real-body counterpart, in terms of its make-up, shape and structure. But bear this in mind; a popularly prescribed hormone called "Premarin" is a natural estrogen hormone, because it's made from a biological organism. Unfortunately, that organism happens to be a horse. Now, it's been quite a while since Biology 101 class, but I don't recall that humans and equines share any biological qualities that are interchangeable.

"Bioidentical" hormones are made entirely in the lab, but they are identical or a clone to the hormones you produce naturally in your body, and they do the same thing. Now, the compounds could come from any source, but the bottom line is, when they enter your body, they do exactly what your body would have done, no more and no less.

A "synthetic" hormone in produced or made in the laboratory by means of a process known as synthesis. But, just because a hormone is synthetic doesn't mean that it's bad, provided that it does exactly what it's supposed to do, in the same way that the body does it. Because it does exactly what it's supposed to, it's actually quite "natural."

The real concern is the clever advertising directing you to choose one hormone over another. "Natural" implies better for you than "synthetic" or "bioidentical," but that may not be the case.

All of that didn't help much, did it? Good, because you should be ever cautious about what you put into your mouth in the form of a pill, or slap onto your body via a patch. Hormone replacement therapy can and does work, but don't let the media or the marketers influence your decision.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Risks

Replacement Therapy

The average age for menopause is 51.4 years. This age has changed very little over the years. However, there is a long period of time prior to the menopause, that lasts approximately 10 years, which is referred to as the climacteric or peri-menopause phase.

So how does a person know when she has completed menopause and transitions into post-menopause? Once you have gone without menstruating for a consecutive 12 month period, then you are considered to have completed the menopause.

Until 2002 hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was routinely used to treat menopausal symptoms and protect long term health. So what changed in 2002? Well, there was a large clinical trial called the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) that reported that HRT actually caused more health risks than benefits for the women in the trial. Doctors started to get very nervous about prescribing it to their patients and as a result, up to two-thirds of women discontinued its use, quite often without even discussing it with their physicians.

Even though there is still plenty of confusion surrounding HRT, it is still considered the most effective treatment for dealing with menopausal symptoms.


North Carolina HRT