Hormone Therapy Wrightsboro NC

Find Wrightsboro Hormone Replacement Near You Today

If you’re looking for relief from menopause symptoms, knowing the pros and cons of Wrightsboro hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can help you decide whether it’s right for you.

Hormone Replacement

What Is WrightsboroHormone Replacement Therapy?

HRT (also known as hormone therapy, menopausal hormone therapy, and estrogen replacement therapy) uses female hormones — estrogen and progesterone — to treat common symptoms of menopause and aging. Doctors can prescribe it during or after menopause.

After your period stops, your hormone levels fall, causing uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and sometimes conditions like osteoporosis. Wrightsboro HRT replaces hormones your body no longer makes. It’s the most effective treatment for menopause symptoms.

What You Should Know About Menopause and Bioidentical Hormones

Benefits Of Hormone Replacement Therapy

Tender breasts or enlargement of breasts:

Men have some testosterone that gets converted to estrogen but normally isn't enough to cause estrogenic side effects such as gynecomastia (breast enlargement) But when taking supplemental doses of testosterone, particularly through hormone replacement therapy, much of it is converted to estradiol. The result of which, is feminized characteristics in men such as enlarge breasts.

Liver Toxicity:

There have been no reports of liver toxicity from transdermal testosterone replacement. However, for those on oral testosterone replacement, there have been a significant number of men reported to have developed liver problems. Incidentally, this is also the reason why all manufacturers of hormone replacement medications are now mentioning the possibility of liver failure when using their products.

Polycythemia:

One of the most important side effects of testosterone replacement therapy is the increase in the red blood cell mass and hemoglobin levels (Polycythemia). This is particularly true of older men as the increase of blood cell mass may lead to the possibility of heart attacks, strokes or peripheral clotting in the veins.

Prostate Growth:

Hormone replacement therapy for men can cause prostate growth. Prostate growth can cause problems with urination or at worse, may promote the growth of cancerous prostate cells. It is noteworthy to state that prostate cancer is a common cancer for older men and the second most common cause of cancer deaths.

The average age for menopause is 51.4 years. This age has changed very little over the years. However, there is a long period of time prior to the menopause, that lasts approximately 10 years, which is referred to as the climacteric or peri-menopause phase.

So how does a person know when she has completed menopause and transitions into post-menopause? Once you have gone without menstruating for a consecutive 12 month period, then you are considered to have completed the menopause.

Until 2002 hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was routinely used to treat menopausal symptoms and protect long term health. So what changed in 2002? Well, there was a large clinical trial called the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) that reported that HRT actually caused more health risks than benefits for the women in the trial. Doctors started to get very nervous about prescribing it to their patients and as a result, up to two-thirds of women discontinued its use, quite often without even discussing it with their physicians.

Even though there is still plenty of confusion surrounding HRT, it is still considered the most effective treatment for dealing with menopausal symptoms.

The average age for menopause is 51.4 years. This age has changed very little over the years. However, there is a long period of time prior to the menopause, that lasts approximately 10 years, which is referred to as the climacteric or peri-menopause phase.

So how does a person know when she has completed menopause and transitions into post-menopause? Once you have gone without menstruating for a consecutive 12 month period, then you are considered to have completed the menopause.

Until 2002 hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was routinely used to treat menopausal symptoms and protect long term health. So what changed in 2002? Well, there was a large clinical trial called the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) that reported that HRT actually caused more health risks than benefits for the women in the trial. Doctors started to get very nervous about prescribing it to their patients and as a result, up to two-thirds of women discontinued its use, quite often without even discussing it with their physicians.

Even though there is still plenty of confusion surrounding HRT, it is still considered the most effective treatment for dealing with menopausal symptoms.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Risks

Estrogen Replacement Therapy

It wasn't until 2002 that the true health risks of hormone replacement therapy were discovered and communicated openly. Up until that time, doctors routinely prescribed HRT to women who were experiencing any sort of menopause symptoms. The most common symptoms where HRT was used were for severe hot flashes and vaginal discomfort. Hot flashes for some women can be extreme where visible sweating occurs while the body attempts to cool it self off. Hot flashes tend to be most severe during the late evening and early in the morning. There are often accompanied by night sweats.

Before women agree to hormone replacement therapy, they need to be fully aware of the health risks associated with this treatment. The combination of estrogen and progestin, a popular HRT, can result in heart disease, blood clots, strokes, breast cancer and dementia. In fact, if you are a breast cancer survivor, any sort of hormone replacement therapy is discouraged strongly even if you suffer from severe menopause symptoms.

HRT is effective at reducing the severity of menopause symptoms as well as decreasing the risk of hip fractures from osteoporosis and colorectal cancer. If you opt to participate in HRT treatment, it is recommended that you go for the smallest dosage possible for the shortest length of time to reduce your risk of the above side effects.

Other improvements in the field of testosterone replacement therapy include different ways of administering testosterone. In the past, testosterone was taken in the form of pills. However, oral intake impacts the effectiveness of the therapy. Also, the medication has to be digested in the liver first before it is absorbed by the body. This dilutes the effect of the medicine and also puts the liver under tremendous stress. These days, testosterone is given through skin patches or injections so that absorption takes place transdermally.

Men undergoing testosterone replacement therapy are generally quite satisfied with the results they experience in terms of increased youthfulness, better muscle mass, lower body fat and of course, remarkable sex drive!

However, patients must be warned that they do not approach the therapy with unusually high expectations. The immediate effects of the therapy are quite intangible. Changes will be observed but these will be small changes only. Do not expect anything dramatic.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Risks

Menopausal Hormone Therapy

Often a clinic that specializes in "Hormone Replacement Therapy" is immediately regarded as an "estrogen" or "testosterone" clinic implying the patients are there for "sexual dysfunction". That simply is not the case if one is going to a "hormonal wellness clinic" or "science based HRT clinic". The reason for the reference by many to the sexual side is much of the discussion centers on what is known as male or female hormones related to sexual functions and sexual male/female characteristics. There are many more hormones than those two, and even those two may require the use of other hormones, specifically DHEA, to effectively assimilate those two hormones into our system properly.

My personal experience has been I go to my medical doctor, actually his experience/training is as an emergency room doctor, and Dr. Hummel analyzes a vast array of hormones and other chemicals to assess whether my body is meeting the minimum demands for hormones for me to live healthy. He looks at the typical blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, testosterone, thyroid function and many more. A baseline is established so the results of hormonal supplements, if needed, can be monitored and measured. If hormones or other medications, such as statins, is warranted then those are prescribed. Several weeks/months later new blood work is ordered to verify the underlying unhealthy pathologies are reversing and improving.


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