Hormone Replacement Wrightsville Beach NC

Find Wrightsville Beach Hormone Replacement Near You Today

If you’re looking for relief from menopause symptoms, knowing the pros and cons of Wrightsville Beach hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can help you decide whether it’s right for you.

Menopause HRT

What Is Wrightsville BeachHormone Replacement Therapy?

HRT (also known as hormone therapy, menopausal hormone therapy, and estrogen replacement therapy) uses female hormones — estrogen and progesterone — to treat common symptoms of menopause and aging. Doctors can prescribe it during or after menopause.

After your period stops, your hormone levels fall, causing uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and sometimes conditions like osteoporosis. Wrightsville Beach HRT replaces hormones your body no longer makes. It’s the most effective treatment for menopause symptoms.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Risks

Hormone Replacement

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), for men, is a treatment applied to those with unusually low testosterone levels. This type of HRT is more commonly known as testosterone replacement therapy.

HRT, generally, is a medication that contains synthetic hormones that can be taken either orally or transdermally. Testosterone replacement medications are essentially anabolic steroids sold legally.

When we say anabolic steroids, we mean those used by athletes to improve strength and muscle mass. They are basically illegal and they can cause serious health problems. Today, they are sold legally in the form of supplements and hormone replacements. Supplements can be purchased freely over the Internet while hormone replacements require a doctor's prescription. Legal or illegal, these supplements and hormone replacements can cause serious health problems.

HRT for men, in particular, can cause a number of harmful side-effects. Contrary to what is generally advertised by drug companies, hormone replacement therapy is not safe. From fluid retention to prostate growth, hormone replacement therapy can be considered one of the most harmful treatments sold legally in the market today.

Side Effects of Testosterone Replacement Therapy

The existing methods of delivery currently include injection, pills, patches, or gel.

Of the injection method, normally it is done either weekly or fortnightly - but the concern is that there will be peaks and troughs of testosterone levels between the last and next injection. These rises and falls of testosterone level can mean high energy and motivation immediately following the injection, gradually waning to lethargy and perhaps even depression leading up to the next injection.

The pills method also has its problems, because the digestive process. Taking pills causes a mass flood of testosterone to be sent to the liver, which is not about it and metabolizes it into estrogen which defeats the whole purpose. The bottom-line is that you are swallowing a lot more testosterone than ever enters your bloodstream.

Patches do provide a regular supply of testosterone directly into your bloodstream via the skin, the only real down-side with them is skin irritation caused by the patches. Rotating to new sites every day can reduce this.

If you truly must have replacement therapy, then without doubt gel is the best of all options. If provides a steady release every day of the hormone into your blood through the skin, and it has no skin irritation side effects.

Better still would be to consider boosting your own production of testosterone using dietary supplements.

If you don't want to participate in hormone replacement therapy while going through menopause, there are some things that you can do to help alleviate some of the symptoms. First, change your diet and eliminate any processed foods. Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. Hot flashes can be brought on by hot, spicy food so limiting these can definitely help. Limiting alcohol and caffeine will also help you sleep better and reduce hot flashes, insomnia, anxiety and mood swings. If you smoke, it may be time to consider stopping for a number of health reasons. Make sure to get plenty of rest and finally, exercise you be the most important thing you can do to help reduce or eliminate symptoms. Walking is great, so are running, golfing, swimming, biking, hiking and weight lifting. The more active you are, the easier it will be getting through menopause.

There are a number of menopause herbal supplements on the market that make big claims. Before taking anything, it is recommended you speak to your doctor to ensure they are right for you and won't cause other side effects.

Herbs and Supplements for Menopausal Symptoms - Is there Any Evidence of Benefit?

Hormone Replacement Therapy Drugs

Exercises include the tensing of the muscles of the pelvic floor that not only improves bladder control, but also increases sexual functioning. They involve tensing and relaxing the muscles around the area of the urethra, vagina and anus.

To understand how these muscle work you can use the following techniques:

  • Begin to urinate and then stop. The same muscle you use to control urination is the muscle that is used during the Kegel exercises.
  • Insert a tampon and squeeze around it; these are the muscles being strengthened.

Kegel exercises can be added into any part of a daily routine-like when you are on the elevator, driving, talking on the phone, or while taking a shower. Repetition is very important and many women have found that these exercises have had a positive impact on their sex life.

When concerned about menopause and bladder control, Kegel exercise is an excellent alternative HRT. Doing your Kegels faithfully can strengthen your pelvic floor muscles enough that a sneeze or heavy lifting be a cause for loss of bladder control.

A key point to this training is that it IS part of an alternative hormone replacement therapy approach, which does not include drugs.

Other placebo controlled trials did not find any efficacy of soy extract for hot flashes. Therefore I do not recommend use of soy extract for hot flashes. However there are no major safety issues with soy so if you want to try it that is fine. Placebo controlled trials have not shown Dong Quai or Evening Primrose Oil to be effective in the treatment of hot flashes.

Alternative medicines that are commonly promoted for symptoms related to menopause include St. John's wort, flaxseed oil, fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids, red clover, ginseng, rice bran oil, wild yam, calcium, gotu kola, licorice root, sage, sarsaparilla, passion flower, chaste berry, ginkgo, and valerian root. None of these have been studied with controlled trials. However since they do not have major health risks associated with them it is OK to try them.

Heidi Nelson, M.D., a Professor of Medicine at Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, Oregon, and colleagues recently reviewed the literature for nonhormonal therapies for hot flashes, looking at the reduction in the number of hot flashes per day with different treatments. They found that hot flashes were reduced with SSRIs by 1.3 per day, with clonidine by -.95 per day, and gabapentine -2.5 per day (all statistically significant). By comparison, HRT reduces hot flashes by 2.5-3 per day. There was no effect of red clover extract, and results were mixed for soy. Other natural remedies for hot flashes were found to lack sufficient controlled trials to make a determination.

Bioidentical Hormones - The Truth About Using Them During Menopause

Menopausal Hormone Therapy

The existing methods of delivery currently include injection, pills, patches, or gel.

Of the injection method, normally it is done either weekly or fortnightly - but the concern is that there will be peaks and troughs of testosterone levels between the last and next injection. These rises and falls of testosterone level can mean high energy and motivation immediately following the injection, gradually waning to lethargy and perhaps even depression leading up to the next injection.

The pills method also has its problems, because the digestive process. Taking pills causes a mass flood of testosterone to be sent to the liver, which is not about it and metabolizes it into estrogen which defeats the whole purpose. The bottom-line is that you are swallowing a lot more testosterone than ever enters your bloodstream.

Patches do provide a regular supply of testosterone directly into your bloodstream via the skin, the only real down-side with them is skin irritation caused by the patches. Rotating to new sites every day can reduce this.

If you truly must have replacement therapy, then without doubt gel is the best of all options. If provides a steady release every day of the hormone into your blood through the skin, and it has no skin irritation side effects.

Better still would be to consider boosting your own production of testosterone using dietary supplements.


North Carolina HRT