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Wilmington North Carolina HRT Specialists 

Bioidentical hormone therapy, when used for the first time, has potential side effects as the body is not used to the new level of hormones. Most of these side effects are also linked to dosage, and it is advisable as your hormones improve, you adjust and in the case of further changes you should contact your physician. One should not confuse side effects with risks common to those who take hormones especially hormone therapy (HT). In older women, the consistent use of hormone therapy can lead to heart diseases and breast cancer while in other people mainly in a youthful state; risks are blood clots, stroke, and gallbladder disease. Below are common side effects of using bioidentical hormone replacement therapy.

Hormonal Therapy

• There is increased aggressiveness in both men and women during the first time of using bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, but problems are resolved as levels become balanced

• There are side effects in women related to breast tenderness, cramping, bloating, and spotting in the body. This side effect is tied to the treatment of hormone estrogen, but it is resolved as hormones are balanced

• Patients commonly complain of itching and redness at the injections, but symptoms disappear as the body adjusts to treatment.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Risks

Hormone Replacement

Our body is like a well-constructed machine, with every part having a multitude of functions. The human body acts properly because of some important hormones that our endocrine system produces. However, as we begin to age, these hormones become insufficient, thus creating an imbalance and leading our body not to function properly. Hormone deficiencies or hormonal imbalance is one of the major problems both men and women experience as they enter midlife. With extensive research, scientists have come up to a solution for hormonal imbalance called Hormone Replacement Therapy. An almost similar treatment is the Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy, which uses hormones that are entirely identical in chemical structure to those found in the human body.

Many doctors and patients have been concerned about reports that estrogen replacement raises the risk of cancer, but is not be the case, if done properly.

When progesterone is given along with estrogen for ten or more days per cycle, it not only eliminates the risk of this cancer but may actually reduce it beyond that which occurs spontaneously. Researchers suggest that the progestin was the good guy in combination of estrogen in hormone replacement therapy, first stimulating mitosis, or breast cell division, followed by the reverse, apoptosis. They speculate that a combined continuous regimen of estrogen and progestin could counteract the cell division needed to produce a cancer.

Women on estrogen therapy have a lower risk of dying from breast cancer than those who do not take hormones.

Estrogen alone has been shown to protect against coronary heart disease, lower cholesterol, and preserve brain function. Estrogen replacement not only sharpens memory and lifts the spirit, but it helps protect against Alzheimer's and shows promise as a treatment for the disease. Estrogen and progesterone work in tandem in the body premenopausally and, increasingly, physicians believe that both hormones should be replaced postmenopausally.

Progesterone alone breaks down fat, increases energy through fat loss, protects against endometrial and breast cancer, improves mood and sexual function, and normalizes the levels of blood sugar, zinc, and copper.

The overall beneficial effects of combined estrogen-progesterone replacement make a good case for multihormonal replacement therapy.

By combining these hormones with DHEA and melatonin, both of which have an anti-cancer effect, and growth hormone that stimulates the natural killer cells that fight cancer, you may be able to enjoy all the health-giving, age-reversing benefits of female sex hormone replacement while lowering the risk of cancer. It is important to see a physician regarding this to make sure it is medically monitored and done properly.

The Risks of Hormone Replacement Therapy for Women

Menopausal Hormone Therapy

Can menopause symptoms be safely comforted with bioidentical hormones? Recent research suggests that menopause can be treated with bioidentical hormones, a natural replacement for a woman's body, with no reported side effects.

In the past, menopause has been treated like a disease - primarily with Hormone Replacement Therapy or HRT (including Premarin, which is made from pregnant mare's urine, Prempro and Provera), which meant ingesting synthetic chemicals on a regular basis. Now we know that these drugs are causing the very problems we're trying to avoid including breast cancer and heart attacks.

Bioidentical means the hormone molecule in the product, for example progesterone cream, acts exactly like the molecules produced by the female body. They function in your body in a natural and normal way unlike synthetic chemicals. A "natural hormone" is really a compound synthesized in the lab from a natural source (such as soybeans used for estrogens and testosterone; or wild Mexican yam in the case of progesterone and sometimes testosterone).

Synthetic hormones are typically only available in oral form, but bioidentical hormones come in a variety of delivery systems such as oral, transdermal patch, cream, lotion or sublingual drops. Bioidentical hormones recently caught mainstream attention in part because of Suzanne Somer's new book, The Sexy Years

Typically a successful approach to dealing with a woman's menopausal symptoms is to begin with laboratory tests of hormone levels called a "hormone panel." The doctor can then prescribe a precise dosage of bioidentical estrogens, testosterone or DHEA that can be made for you at a Compounding Pharmacy This is contrary to HRT treatments that are typically "one size fits all."

Most doctors prescribing bioidentical hormones find that a large percentage of women find some relief by using medical-grade supplements, over-the-counter bioidentical progesterone, and dietary and lifestyle changes (including the proper nutrition and exercise). And, for the percentage of women who need a little more help, most doctors don't support the idea that bioidentical hormones should be used indefinitely as some kind of fountain of youth.

Is it right for you to treat your menopause with bioidentical hormones? First you need to consult with a doctor to get the right answer for you. Once you know what you need, your doctor and you can work out the best alternative for your body.

Hormone Replacement Therapy Risks

Replacement Therapy

With publicity about the dangers of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) getting so much publicity, a lot of women are turning to herbs and supplements for hot flashes and other symptoms associated with menopause. Soy, black cohosh, Dong Quai root, and Evening primrose oil have all been promoted for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. But do they really work? An initial study of 104 postmenopausal women randomized to 40 g daily of soy or a placebo showed a statistically significant reduction in number of hot flashes that was greater for soy (45%) that was greater than the reduction obtained with placebo (30%). Another study of 351 women age 45-55 with two or more hot flash symptoms per day were randomly assigned to black cohosh, multibotanicals, multibotanicals plus dietary soy counseling, placebo or hormone therapy for one year. Only hormone therapy was associated with significant reductions in hot flashes. Taking dietary soy actually turned out to be less effective at stopping hot flashes than taking a placebo for one year.