Hormone Replacement Kure Beach NC

Find Kure Beach HRT Near You Today

If you’re looking for relief from menopause symptoms, knowing the pros and cons of Kure Beach hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can help you decide whether it’s right for you.

What Is Hormone Therapy

What Is Kure BeachHormone Replacement Therapy?

HRT (also known as hormone therapy, menopausal hormone therapy, and estrogen replacement therapy) uses female hormones — estrogen and progesterone — to treat common symptoms of menopause and aging. Doctors can prescribe it during or after menopause.

After your period stops, your hormone levels fall, causing uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and sometimes conditions like osteoporosis. Kure Beach HRT replaces hormones your body no longer makes. It’s the most effective treatment for menopause symptoms.

Bioidentical Hormones - The Truth About Using Them During Menopause

What Is Hormone Replacement Therapy

So the medical profession insists on using what it is familiar with, and that is drugs. Bioidentical hormones are becoming more familiar to doctors, and more and more doctors are willing to prescribe them. But its far from the majority--many will not.

Why bother with bioidentical hormones? Wouldn't they have the same side effects as what doctors now prescribe. Doctors who use them say no, that they do not have the side effects and risks of drug HRT. While most women are already aware of the risks associated with hormone replacement therapy, it may be helpful to look at the issue quickly.

Risks of HRT

Many studies have underscored the risks of HRT. The biggest is The Women's Health Initiative. The study followed 160,000 women between 1993 and 1998. It compared the health of women on different combinations of HRT with women who were not.

The study reported that the women on HRT had greater risk for a variety of health problems. The study showed that the women on HRT had a significantly increased risk for breast cancer, heart attack, stroke and blood clots. The study showed that HRT benefited some conditions, decreasing the risk of colorectal cancer and of hip fractures due to osteoporosis.

A point of confusion for some people is the difference between side effects and risks when taking a prescriptive drug. This is certainly true when it comes to hormone replacement therapy or HRT. HRT refers to synthetic hormones prescribed primarily to relieve menopause related complaints such as hot flashes, night sweats, erratic periods, excessive bleeding during perimenopause, etc.

Risks associated with HRT

There are long term risks associated with taking prescriptive hormones as part of replacement therapy. You may have taken prescriptive hormones for years with no side effects whatsoever, and they may have dramatically relieved your menopausal hot flashes, sweats and other complaints. Yet you are now at greater risk for a variety of serious illnesses including breast cancer, uterine cancer, stroke and heart attack to name a few. These are the risks associated with HRT. Research studies have found so many serious risks associated with hormone replacement therapy that most medical doctors are unwilling to routinely prescribe hormone replacement for relief of menopause related complaints. Rightly so, they don't want to put their patient's at risk for life threatening conditions.

Let's look more closely at the risks associated with replacement therapy. Much of our knowledge of these risks comes from the Women's Health Initiative, a study that tracked the health of thousands of women, some taking hrt and others not. The study was eventually stopped as it became clear that there was a dramatically increased risk of breast cancer among the women undergoing HRT. Because of the complex nature of the study, the results are difficult to summarize succinctly. Numerous other studies have also clarified the risks and benefits associated with hormone replacement. Here is a broad picture of the level of risk associated with hormone replacement, followed by the benefits.

Hormone replacement therapy risks

  • Breast cancer risk increased by 24 percent with combined estrogen / progestin HRT
  • Risk of ischemic stroke increased by 41 percent with medium to high dose HRT, but much less risk with ultra low dose hormone replacement
  • Heart attack risk increases by 29 percent for those taking HRT
  • Slightly increased risk of ovarian cancer when only estrogen is taken for more than 10 years
  • Twenty-one percent increased risk of kidney stones
  • Higher risk of developing gall stones

Hormone replacement benefits

  • Relief of menopause related complaints
  • Increases bone density
  • Reduces risk for colon-rectal cancer
  • Decreases risk of macular (eye) degeneration and loss of vision associated with aging

The side effects of HRT

Side effects are generally considered to be any temporary complaints that are experienced while taking a drug. Side effects often resolve soon after stopping the medication. Using this description, the side effects of hormone replacement are not well known. These side effects vary depending on which combination of hormones one is taking and the specific synthetic forms used. Some of the more common side effects of prescriptive forms of estrogen, progesterone and combinations of both are as follows.

  • Breast pain, enlargement and tenderness is associated with the stimulatory effect of estrogen
  • Nausea and vomiting with the use of estrogen HRT taken by mouth
  • Vaginal bleeding can occur in association with oral estrogen
  • Darkened skin spots tend to occur on the face
  • Headaches of a migraine type are associated with taking synthetic progesterone or progestins
  • Depression is a common complaint that is found to be a result of taking progestins
  • Greasy skin and acne are also associated with progestin use

Women are wisely looking for alternatives to hormone replacement. Fearing the risks associated with it, added to the side effects of prescriptive hormones, they are not too excited by it. Researchers and academics argue for and against hormone replacement.

The author's of a 2008 study titled the Women's International Study of Long-Duration Oestrogen after the Menopausesuggested that their study demonstrated such significant benefits for relief of menopause complaints that HRTshould be reconsidered by many women.

One of their colleagues (not an author of the study) reviewed the results of their study and came up with the opposite conclusion. Underscoring her concerns regarding the risks of hormone replacement therapy, Professor Anne Kavanagh of the University of Melbourne recently countered their claims as to the benefits of hormone replacement therapy. Professor Kavanagh points out that the study did not show and overall improvement in the "quality of life" for women in the study.

The existing methods of delivery currently include injection, pills, patches, or gel.

Of the injection method, normally it is done either weekly or fortnightly - but the concern is that there will be peaks and troughs of testosterone levels between the last and next injection. These rises and falls of testosterone level can mean high energy and motivation immediately following the injection, gradually waning to lethargy and perhaps even depression leading up to the next injection.

The pills method also has its problems, because the digestive process. Taking pills causes a mass flood of testosterone to be sent to the liver, which is not about it and metabolizes it into estrogen which defeats the whole purpose. The bottom-line is that you are swallowing a lot more testosterone than ever enters your bloodstream.

Patches do provide a regular supply of testosterone directly into your bloodstream via the skin, the only real down-side with them is skin irritation caused by the patches. Rotating to new sites every day can reduce this.

If you truly must have replacement therapy, then without doubt gel is the best of all options. If provides a steady release every day of the hormone into your blood through the skin, and it has no skin irritation side effects.

Better still would be to consider boosting your own production of testosterone using dietary supplements.

Estrogen, Progesterone, And Cancer

Benefits Of Hormone Replacement Therapy

Fluid Retention:

After just a few months into the treatment, many men prescribed with hormone replacement therapy methods complain of fluid retention. Swelling usually occurs in the ankles or legs. Most of the time, this is accompanied with high blood pressure or congestive heart failure.

Sleep apnea:

Sleep apnea is a condition in which an individual stops breathing for a period of time while sleeping. There have been many reported cases of this condition of men who are under hormone replacement therapy. Interestingly, although the public has been warned of this possibility, drug companies have released several statements denying this fact. As per their conclusion, the studies conducted associating testosterone replacement therapy and sleep apnea are weak and require further investigation.

Spermatogenesis:

The production of sperm in all men is dependent on production of testosterone by the testes. When hormone replacement therapy is applied to men who are testosterone deficient, the testes begin to stop producing natural testosterones altogether. This condition may either be temporary or permanent. For this reason, most doctors prefer to apply this form of treatment to men who already have children. This risk is not only a possibility but has been proven to be absolute for all those under this form of medication.

I agree with Dr. Christiane Northrup, a leading expert on women's health and wellness when she writes in her Nov 2009 Huffington Post Blog entry. Dr. Northrup posts: "I encourage every woman to learn about the hormone therapy options available today. They are vast, and there are many excellent choices made from bio-identical hormones. I also encourage every woman to look with a critical eye when reading the news about HRT. It's likely that there will continue to be controversial and conflicting information."

While my own personal preference is for all natural remedies, and I would not consider HRT, I do believe that we women deserve to have ALL of the information available to make an informed choice regarding our own health and wellness. Therefore, I am recommending that you ask your doctor for more information on bio-identical hormone replacement and do your research on the latest studies, as well as the many choices for all natural symptom relief like the tips and techniques that can be found here. Then you will have the information without the hype.

Best of Health,

HRT Vs Natural - And the Winner Is?

Estrogen Therapy

There is also medical evidence proving that hormone replacement therapy reduces the risk of developing cancer of the rectum or colon also known as colorectal cancer. The risk of coronary heart disease is also reduced when estrogen replacements are taken soon after menopause occurs. Maintaining normal levels of estrogen hormone reduces the risks of heart disease in these women. A combined prescription of both progestin and estrogen hormones is needed to avoid the risk of cancer of the uterus which may increase with the use of estrogen hormones alone. Replacement hormones are indeed the most widely used treatments used for symptoms associated with menopause.

Replacement hormone therapies not only help to solve problems related to menopause but they also facilitate graceful aging in women. Most of the ingredients which make these hormones are extracted from plants and are 100 percent identical to the hormones produced by the human body. It is important for women to have balanced hormone levels after menopause to avoid the aforementioned nagging symptoms. The replacement hormones come in different forms such as pills, creams, and oral supplements. Proper tests should however be done first to determine one's specific needs and thus help to identify an appropriate replacement therapy approach. Really this is a very interesting topic.


North Carolina HRT